Businesses in Brougham Towns and Villages of Cumbria

Brougham

(See also Brougham Castle , St Ninian Church , Brougham Hall , St Wilfred Chapel)

Brougham by Chris Daley FlickrThe village of Brougham (really a scattering of farms and houses rather than a traditional village) was occupied by the Romans and the Normans. Brougham Castle was built partly on the site of the Roman fort, Brocavum. The fort is thought to have been occupied from the second to the end of the fourth century. Both cavalry and infantry would be stationed at the fort. Parts of the bank and ditch can be spotted just south of Brougham Castle. A number of stone altars were recovered from the site.

Ranulph de Meschines was given the manor of Brougham, but King John, in the late 12th century, gave it to the Veteripont family–the previous owner had taken part in the plot to murder Thomas á Becket.

Brougham Castle by Chris Daley FlickrBrougham Castle was constructed during the reign of Henry II continuing into the 13th and early 14th centuries. It eventually was owned by the famous Lady Anne Clifford, Countess of Pembroke.

Two historic churches are found in the village: St Wilfred's Chapel and St Ninian's Church

The most famous monument in Brougham, located between the two churches, is the Countess Pillar, Lady Anne's memorial to her mother, erected in 1656. It was an inspiration for one of William Wordsworth's poems in ‘The Prelude’.

Brougham Hall by amclean75 FlickrAnother historic attraction is Brougham Hall. The hall no longer exists, but ongoing restoration is taking place to save the exterior walls and rooms. There are special events and craft shops to enjoy.

Near Brougham is Whinfell Forest, home to a red squirrel reserve.
For details of other Brougham attractions, their locations, and opening hours see the links above.

Photos courtesy Chris Daley , amclean75

Brougham is located two mile south-east of Penrith Brocavum Roman fort is just off the A66, two miles south of Penrith.

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