Businesses in Staveley (Kendal) Towns and Villages of Cumbria

Staveley (Kendal)

(Not to be confused with Staveley-in-Cartmel)

Staveley main street courtesy of Graeme DougalStaveley's grey stone buildings are nestled between the River Kent and River Gowan. This once treed area was inhabited as early as 4000BC. Farmers settled first and were followed by the Romans.

Suffering its share of problems during medieval times, the village continued to grow. It gained a market charter in 1329 and began holding annual fairs and weekly markets. In 1341 a fulling mill operated in the village.

Staveley weir and pond courtesy of Graeme DougalTransportation and the Industrial Revolution brought boom times. A café and other shops now exist on the site of an old wood mill. At its busiest the mill employed about 200 workers. Visitors can still see where the water was drawn off above the weir and channelled along the race to the waterwheel, replaced in 1902 with turbines.

Bobbin turning was the foremost industry by 1850, but, at its demise, other industries thrived. Among them were the manufacturing of diatomite, motorcycles, and photographic paper.

Staveley remains of St Margaret church courtesy of Graeme DougalSt Margaret's Church was built in 1388. Only its tower remains. St James took its place in 1864 and shows off a stained glass east window designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and made by William Morris and Co. A Primitive Methodist Chapel was erected in 1834 and a Wesleyan one in 1836.

Staveley, at the Kentmere valley's southern end, is both a residential and industrial town. It is a handy centre for walkers with easy access to the High Street fells and the Kentmere horseshoe.

Photos courtesy of Graeme Dougal

Staveley is off the A591, between Kendal and Windermere.

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