Businesses in Ulpha Towns and Villages of Cumbria

Ulpha

(See also Duddon Valley)

Duddon Valley towards Ulpha courtesy Lakeland camUlpha means the wolfs hill. The village, in the Lake District National Park, is situated in one of Wordsworths favourite valleys, the Duddon.

The construction date of St John the Baptist church in Ulpha is not known, but the east window is thought to date from theUlpha Kirk exterior courtesy Andy Wallace 17th century. The churchs windows are plain glass. Constructed of stone, the buildings exterior and interior are white. Two bells hang from the turret at the entrance. 17th and 18th century wall decorations include Queen Annes royal arms. The entrance is marked by a slate-roofed lych gate. Wordsworth wrote of the church:


“Kirk of Ulpha to the pilgrim's eye
Is welcome as a star, that doth present
Its shining forehead through the peaceful rent
Of a black cloud diffused o'er half the sky;
. . . . . . . .
How sweet were leisure! could it yield no more
Than mid that wave-washed churchyard to recline,
From pastoral graves extracting thoughts divine
Or there to pace, and mark the summit's hear
Of distant moonlit mountains faintly shine,
Sooth'd by the unseen river's gentle roar.”

Ulpha Kirk Interior courtesy Andy WallaceA Methodist chapel provided another place of worship. A post office/general store serves local needs. At one time there was a manor hall here, but it fell into ruin. Sea trout and salmon are fished in the nearby Duddon river. A shepherds meet is held the second Saturday in November. A packhorse bridge marks the former boundary between Cumberland and Lancashire.

Photos courtesy of Andy Wallace , Tony Richards

Ulpha is on a minor road from the A595, four miles from Broughton in Furness.

Back To Town or Villages

© 1997 - 2017 by The Cumbria Directory. Reproduction of this work in whole or in part, including images, and reproduction in electronic media, without documented permission from The Cumbria Directory is prohibited.